I'm a radical queer, black, enabled/non-disabled settler with a lot of (straight/white/cis/male) passing privilege. I'm an anti-violence activist, theorist, and student. I'm a comic book reading, video game playing, tabletop rpg loving dork.

Sometimes I have things to say.

Ask me about supporting queer and trans* people in prison.

 

memewhore:

yamino:

tristifere:

himteckerjam:

intersectionalfeminism:

Acephobia in the LGBT+ Community from the documentary (A)sexuality. 

It is just…so fucking weird how threatened people feel when it comes to Asexuality.  I still can’t wrap my mind around it.

I’m so happy this post is being reblogged by LBGT+ people who aren’t asexual. I keep on reading posts by non-ace LGBT+ people of support to the ace community, and of being stunned by this reaction by a movement which should know better than to judge. AND THAT MAKES THIS ACE SO FREAKING HAPPY. The woman in the first photo expresses my sentiment. I know I belong in the queer/LGBTQIA movement. I want to belong. But I just don’t know if I’m welcome. I’m so happy that there are so many people on Tumblr who do not fall into the catagory of outright refusal of asexuality.

I know not a lot of people understand asexuality. And I know there’s confusion about it, about our experiences, and about how we fit in the movement. But let’s talk about this. Let’s have this conversation.

I mostly don’t delve into the ace tags, but I hear there’s a lot of ace-hate that and I really don’t get it.  I don’t understand how asexuality is threatening.

You know what I (as a queer ace-spectrum person) find most threatening?  Getting unwanted sexual unwanted advances from both queer and straight people. I’ve gotten them from people of all spectrums and it always makes me profoundly uncomfortable, and often unsafe.  It just boggles my mind how people are upset by the concept of asexuality.  That’s like getting really mad at someone who isn’t hungry.  What’s the point?  Just shut up eat your own sandwich. (And stop chewing on me.)

It baffles me that this is, like, an actual issue or something, for people who aren’t asexuals.  And what is so difficult to understand about it?  What the hell?  What is the problem?????

It baffles me that ANYONE’S sexuality is an issue for anyone else. 

uncle-anwar:

agnostic-gnostic:

alwaysatrombonist:

But literally, in science classes, we have to learn the names of white men who were totally wrong.

"This is the name of a white man. He came up with this theory. This theory was totally wrong. You will be tested on his name and his totally wrong theory."

Are white men so important that the fact that they had any thoughts at all is important enough to learn and be tested on?

 

#freud

merkkultra:

do men have resting bitch faces as well or do they not have negative characteristics ascribed to them for putting on a neutral rather than a deliriously happy facial expression

outrageandsprinkles:

coelasquid:

stardusted:

Aussie Builders surprise public with loud empowering statements in new Snickers Australia Ad.

I wonder how many people actually bothered watching the ad

image

image

Eat snickers, prevent yourself from unwittingly respecting women.

Reblogging for the important added screenshots. 

Seriously, this add was total shit. It’s all about men loudly shouting their opinions in public, men feeling entitled to women’s time and attention, men WASTING women’s time when they’re just trying to go about their day, men putting their own desires above the needs/comfort of women on the street. And people think this shit is empowering!? Even without the gross pithy punchline that is meant to suggest men (or at least working class men/construction workers) are inherently abusive to women, not a single aspect of this dude’s behavior is about “respecting women”.

angrybisexualcesium:

tbh the only reason anybody is “straight-passing” is because of the common and harmful conception that heterosexuality is the default and that queerness must have extreme and visible markers to be valid

queercruzan:

"I think about how in queer communities, especially queer people of color communities, you know how much shit your lovers/partners have been through. How they are often survivors, if not of physical or sexual violence, then definitely of the violence of oppression. How can we hold them accountable and still get them the support they need for the fucked up shit they have been through and still keep ourselves safe? How do we share community? How do survivors get past the shock that “one of us” is recreating the violence? The guilt of not wanting to add to our lover’s oppression or make their situation worse? The fear that the community we found or created will hate us, shun us, expel us for shaking up the foundation of trust we thought we shared?"
—jai dulani “the revolution starts at home: pushing through the fear”


so i’m pretty sure this zine is just going to have me sobbing the entire time.

What we call ‘community accountability’ (some call it transformative justice, others call it as many names as there are people) has existed for as long as we hold collective memory. A simple definition of community accountability: any strategy to address violence, abuse or harm that creates safety, justice, reparations, and healing, without relying on police, prisons, childhood protective services, or any other state systems. Instead of police and prisons, community accountability strategies depend on something both potentially more accessible and more complicated: the communities surrounding the person who was harmed and the person who caused harm.


Many people are also working with the term ‘transformative justice.’ The organization generationFIVE defines transformative justice as ‘an approach to respond to and prevent child sexual abuse and other forms of violence that puts transformation and liberation at the heart of the change. It is an approach that looks at the experiences of both the individuals and communities involved, and the larger social conditions at work; an approach that seeks to integrate both personal and social transformation.

Excerpt from The Revolution Starts at Home by Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha

Here is the full PDF 

(via labrujamorgan)

heroes-get-made:

Shout out to interracial, bisexual, pansexual, genderfluid, and otherwise “gray” or “mixed” people who get to deal with shit from pretty much every angle all while having your identity erased, ignored, or redefined for you whenever another group sees fit. I see you, love you, and want to make things better.